Economic Damages of Primates on Farmlands in Old Oyo National Park Neighbourhood  

Oladapo Olukoya Oduntan , Oluyinka Akintunde , David Oladipo Ogunyode , Oluwatosin Adesina , Abiodun Olusegun Oladoye
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria
Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta
Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta
Author    Correspondence author
International Journal of Molecular Ecology and Conservation, 2012, Vol. 2, No. 4   doi: 10.5376/ijmec.2012.02.0004
Received: 17 Sep., 2012    Accepted: 24 Sep., 2012    Published: 31 Oct., 2012
© 2012 BioPublisher Publishing Platform
This is an open access article published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Preferred citation for this article:

Oduntan et al., 2012, Economic Damages of Primates on Farmlands in Old Oyo National Park Neighborhood, International Journal of Molecular Ecology and Conservation, Vol.2, No.4, 21-25 (doi: 10.5376/ijmec.2012.02.0004)

Abstract

This paper investigated an estimated amount of losses incur due to damages caused by Primates on farmlands and the methods of control in the neighbourhood of Old Oyo National Park, Nigeria. Primary data were collected and used for the study. Data were collected through the use of open-ended questionnaires administered to all the affected farmers in the study area. Non-probability snowballing method was used in locating and sampling affected farmers. The result revealed that an estimated average of ₦3 979.18±5.79, ₦3 981.33±3.67, ₦3 974.60±6.85, ₦3 905.85±6.32 worth of Yam tubers were lost by each farmer in Abanla, Imodi, Budo Alhaji and Fomu villages respectively. Also, an estimated average of ₦67 656.35±420.90, ₦68 248.14±500.97, ₦66 094.73±482.22, ₦67 817.90±554.17 worth of maize were lost on farmlands by each farmer at Abanla, Imodi, Budo Alhaji and Fomu villages respectively. In addition, an estimated average of ₦4 780.13±1.53, ₦3 993.09±4.50, ₦5 834.50±4.48, ₦5 321.33±3.99 worth of cassava plants or tubers were lost to primate in the respective villages mentioned. Furthermore, most of the respondents (43.33%, 50%, 39.3% and 46.15% at Abanla, Imodi, Budo Alhaji and Fomu respectively) engaged the use of fire arms in the control of Primates on their farmlands. Results also shows that three basic techniques used in controlling damages by Primates in the study areas are; fire arms, traps and chasing. Recommendations were made based on the outcome of the study.

Keywords
Wildlife; Conservation; Damage control; Conflicts
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