Carbon Partitioning and Allometric Relationships between Stem Diameter and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) in Plant Components of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lamk. and Lumnitzera racemosa Willd. in a Microtidal Basin Estuary in Sri Lanka  

K.A.R.S. Perera1 , M.D. Amarasinghe2
1. The Open University of Sri Lanka, Nawala, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka
2. Department of Botany, University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya, Sri Lanka
Author    Correspondence author
International Journal of Marine Science, 2013, Vol. 3, No. 9   doi: 10.5376/ijms.2013.03.0009
Received: 05 Jan., 2013    Accepted: 14 Jan., 2013    Published: 20 Feb., 2013
© 2013 BioPublisher Publishing Platform
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Perera and Amarasinghe, 2013, Carbon Partitioning and Allometric Relationships between Stem Diameter and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) in Plant Components of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lamk. and Lumnitzera racemosa Willd. in a Microtidal Basin Estuary in Sri Lanka, International Journal of Marine Science, Vol.3, No.9 72-78 (doi: 10.5376/ijms.2013.03.0009)

Abstract

Plants sequester carbon and this capacity depends on their net primary productivity and pattern of biomass/carbon partitioning within them which is less well studied for mangroves. Above (A) to below (B)-ground carbon ratio (A/B) of both Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Lamk. and Lumnitzera racemosa Willd. from where micro-tidal conditions prevail, Negombo estuary, Sri Lanka (7°11′42.18″ N ~ 79°50′47.50″ E) was approximately 3, and it resembles that of terrestrial plants than that of mangroves in macro-tidal coasts.  Relatively low inundation frequency, duration and depth apparently promote aerial growth than root production. Wet oxidation without external heating, followed by colorimetric method was adopted to determine total organic carbon (TOC) of plant components. Except for leaves of L. racemosa, nearly half the biomass of all other components of the two species was composed of TOC. Statistically significant allometric relationships exist among TOC and dbh (diameter at breast height) of trees. As 96.5% of TOC in L. racemosa was in sequestered form (in the wood) it is superior to B. gymnorrhiza which accumulates carbon only 78.7% in sequestered form. Profuse branching of L. racemosa contributes to carbon sequestration capacity of the species.

Keywords
Allometric relationships, Carbon sequestration, Organic carbon; Mangroves
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